A Slow Day at Manchester Uni Juggling Club...

On Wednesday I went to the Manchester University Juggling Club, not to do any juggling but to practice some filming techniques for my graduate film. While I was there with my camera, James, Casper and Tony wanted to film some tricks and patterns in slow motion. I set up my camera to 100 frames per second and here are the results....


Youtube link for Iphones, etc.

While I was filming I was constantly moving the camera around between shots and reframing. When Casper asked why I said "Because I don't want to make a rubbish juggling video." He looked a bit surprised and I realised he could have taken it as a negative comment about his juggling abilities, so I quickly explained:

Any good juggler can make a video of good juggling but not many can make a good video of juggling.

I hope that makes sense. I also hope I succeeded in not making a rubbish juggling video...

Film 13/52 - Slow Doggy

Over the next few days I am going to be updating this blog with the Experimental Films from the last few weeks. I'm a bit behind because I have been on holiday for a week and been shooting a second university film for the next.

The first is another slow motion experiment I shot just before I left for Scotland...



Whoever said "Never work with children or animals" was right. Bronx jumped onto my camera, put his wet nose on the wide angle lens and wouldn't stop licking the microphone. In this film you can see him catch food, chase his tail, roll over, run through a tunnel and jump! Despite all that and the dodgy in-camera compression, I quite like this lazy vid...

Film 09/52 - Slow Rolling

This month my theme is going to be Time Manipulation.

With this in mind I have been experimenting with the Slow Motion Capture settings on my Sony HVR camera. It shoots at 100 frames a second so the footage plays back at 25% of the original speed. This is good enough to slow things down so new visual phenomena can be seen but it is no where near “humming bird wings” slow.

I took my camera along to canoe club on Wednesday. Here are the results:


Although these shots are quite good the camera system is not very flexible for a couple of reasons…

The exposure time is set at 1/210 of a second. This is too short for the low light at the subterranean pool on Wednesday night so I had to boost up the gain a bit.

Secondly the camera stores a set amount of frames in it’s memory then writes them to tape when the shot is finished. It can shoot for 3, 6 or 12 seconds but the longer the shot the poorer the video quality. The more movement (and change in visual information) between each frame the more the camera has to compress the video means there are loads of artifacts and it looks awful. A swimming pool must be one of the worse places to film as the water is constantly moving across the whole frame. All the clips in this week’s video were shot in 3 second segments.

And lastly a pool is not the most healthy place for an expensive camera to be. A bit too much splashy water to get the camera up close enough for the most dynamic shot construction.

I hope you like it. Next week will either be some slow mo juggling or some slight of hand magic tricks shown to be what they really are.